Benefits of Different Types of Exercise

Muscle in the human body is very important for metabolism. Each time you move your arm, or blink your eye, or tap your leg, you are moving a muscle. This is important to know because each time the muscle moves it shreds the muscle fibers slightly, breaking them down slowly, and thus using some energy (sugar). At night when you sleep, and also when at rest, your body must regenerate these muscles, which takes even more energy (more sugar). Your muscles are constantly renewing and regenerating themselves, replacing old muscle with new.

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Strengthening Exercises

Muscle in the human body is very important for metabolism. Each time you move your arm, or blink your eye, or tap your leg, you are moving a muscle. This is important to know because each time the muscle moves it shreds the muscle fibers slightly, breaking them down slowly, and thus using some energy (sugar). At night when you sleep, and also when at rest, your body must regenerate these muscles, which takes even more energy (more sugar). Your muscles are constantly renewing and regenerating themselves, replacing old muscle with new.

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The Problems with Fueling for an Evening Workout

There’s a lot to be said for the consistency you build around working out in the morning. Aside from the initial discomfort of getting out of bed, it really doesn’t disrupt your daily flow much: You simply wake up, have a quick snack (or coffee), hit the training session and resume your normal daily activities.

Of course, not everyone is a morning person and not all activities (like group classes) are available at sunrise. Evening workouts provide the same benefit as a morning workout routine, but evening workouts can throw off many daily patterns, especially for eating, and especially in the evening. Going straight from the office to the gym can push dinner time from 6pm to 8 or even 9pm. Continue reading “The Problems with Fueling for an Evening Workout”

Managing Hypoglycemia During Exercise

Hypoglycemia and Physical Activity

People taking insulin or insulin secretagogues (oral diabetes pills that cause your pancreas to make more insulin) are at risk for hypoglycemia, or low blood sugars, if their food or medications aren’t adjusted to account for exercise.
Checking your blood sugar before and after a physical activity is important to prevent hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Talk to your diabetes care team (doctor, nurse, dietitian or pharmacist) to find out if you are at risk for hypoglycemia.
It is important to become familiar with how your body responds to different durations and types of exercise.
Checking your blood sugar level more often before and around 30 minutes after exercise can help you see the benefits of activity. You also can use the results of your blood sugar checks to see how your body to reacts to different activities. Understanding these patterns can help you prevent your blood sugar from going too high or too low.

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